Star Trails and Northern Lights…

Last night’s buzz was that there was a pretty good possibility of seeing northern lights, which is something I’ve been wanting to try to shoot for a while now.  I’ve also wanted to try shooting some star trails, so here are my first attempts…IMG_1989-Edit

The bright green glow from the northern lights…IMG_1995-Edit-2IMG_2004-Edit

I thought these were pretty fun to do and can’t wait to do some more the next clear night and throughout lambing season.  🙂

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Weekly Top Shot #167

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Hunting Christmas Trees…

Our family had such a great time a couple weekends ago, hunting Christmas trees and hanging out with some friends of ours while enjoying the snow…IMG_4427

Tug-of-war…

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Sled rides…

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Playing in the snow…

IMG_4541Looking and searching for that special tree…IMG_4438 IMG_4482

My husband with our bush of a tree, bigger around than it was tall…IMG_4499 IMG_4517 IMG_4527

Pulling our trees back to the vehicles…IMG_4537

Some of the kids put up trees in their rooms…IMG_4525-2

A little fire was built to help warm in the kids and cook supper…IMG_4545  IMG_4547

Jetboil apple cider to warm up with too…IMG_4548

Cutting hot dog roasting sticks…IMG_4549

Little Emma’s feet were wet and cold…IMG_4551

Roasting those hot dogs…IMG_4560 IMG_4567 IMG_4573-Edit IMG_4575

Emma’s new slippers!  A pair of gloves to keep her feet warm…IMG_4586 IMG_4590 IMG_4611 IMG_4616

Loading the tree up…IMG_4622

The beautiful misty, foggy sunset in the forest that evening…

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Awesome day spent with great friends…

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Montana At It’s Finest…

Last night we had pouring rain and 40 degrees, sometime in the night it changed to snow and wind.  This morning it was brisk -30 degrees Fahrenheit!  I don’t mind the cold or snow but sure get hard on critters when we have wet conditions and then gets really cold.  I was happy to see every one fared the night alright and were anxiously awaiting breakfast this morning…

Teigen feeding Thor…

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Even though he has a cozy little place to hide out in, Thor has to hang out with his guys…IMG_9199

Horse raspberries…IMG_9167IMG_9257IMG_9184 IMG_9270 IMG_9193

Waiting for breakfast…IMG_9196

Frank’s a bit frosty too…IMG_9205 IMG_9194

Hayden giving Frank some love…IMG_9212

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Hauling bales…

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At least some one is happy outside…IMG_9179

The sun even tried to break through…IMG_9275

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Saturday’s Critters

Turquoise….

These bighorn sheep are beside a naturally turquoise lake formed by glacial rock flour…IMG_0197Blue, frozen glacial ice…IMG_1057-Edit IMG_0931 IMG_0992-Edit

Got Milk?. . .
The beautiful turquoise color shown in the photo is the true color of the water. Sometimes called “glacial milk”, the unusual color is due to the presence of “rock flour”, which consists of tiny clay particles formed as rocks stuck to the bottom and sides of a glacier grind against bedrock. This abrasion reduces some of the bedrock to a fine powder that looks like the flour used to make bread. As the ice melts this rock flour is exposed and transported away by meltwater, often into a nearby tarn.

They won’t settle down! . . . .
Meltwater also transports pebbles, sand, and silt into the lake, but these larger rock particles quickly settle to the bottom of the lake. In contrast, the much smaller particles of rock flour remain suspended in the water until the fall when the meltwater stops flowing or the lake freezes over. Only then does the water become calm enough to let rock flour settle to the bottom. A core sample from the middle of the lake would probably reveal alternating layers of silt and clay called “varves”. . . . One layer of each (varve) for every year the lake has been in existence.

Why so blue? . . .
Sunlight includes many different wavelengths of light ranging from the longer “reds” to the shorter “violets” (ROYGBIV). A white T-shirt is white because it reflects all of the wavelengths, a black shirt is colorless because it absorbs all of the wavelengths, and a red shirt is red because it absorbs the OYGBIV and reflects the R (red wavelengths). Apparently the tiny particles of rock flour suspended in the lake are just the right size to reflect more of the blues and some of the greens than any of the other wavelengths.

Information from formontana.net

Visit here for more info…

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