Moose and calf…

In Many Glacier we are often blessed to be able to watch moose do their own thing.  We get to watch them graze the bottoms of lake beds and watch them bring their baby calves down to explore…IMG_5750 IMG_5744 IMG_5737 IMG_5720 IMG_5717 IMG_5797 IMG_5796 IMG_5793 IMG_5784 IMG_5775 IMG_5756 IMG_5751

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Saturday night we received a bit of rain and awoke to smoke-free skies.  Sunday afternoon we took a drive to through Glacier Park.


Watching the storm clouds roll-in on Avalanche Creek…


Clouds rolling across the valley on Going-to-the-Sun Road…


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Soot from the Reynolds Creek Fire, running off in the rain onto some red rocks..


A quick rainbow over St. Mary’s Lake…IMG_5000

A black bear crossing the road in Many Glacier in the rain…


We ended up enjoying our day in the rain. Normally, we would have been a bit bummed to spend the day in the rain but with the wildland fires and evacuations going on, smokey suffocating skies and how badly we need the rain this year, it really was a great day.  Kind of funny how a different perspective on things can change an attitude.  Skies have been without smoke all week, even though we still have the majority of the fires burning and we are suppose to be getting more rain, maybe even some snow in higher elevations throughout the weekend.  🙂

Going for a Dip…

Wood Ducks are one my favorites!  I was so excited when we spotted this guy…IMG_5808 IMG_5810 IMG_5811 IMG_5812 IMG_5816 IMG_5822 IMG_5823 IMG_5824

Cool Facts

  • Natural cavities for nesting are scarce, and the Wood Duck readily uses nest boxes provided for it. If nest boxes are placed too close together, many females lay eggs in the nests of other females.
  • The Wood Duck nests in trees near water, sometimes directly over water, but other times over a mile away. After hatching, the ducklings jump down from the nest tree and make their way to water. The mother calls them to her, but does not help them in any way. The ducklings may jump from heights of over 50 feet without injury.
  • Wood Ducks pair up in January, and most birds arriving at the breeding grounds in the spring are already paired. The Wood Duck is the only North American duck that regularly produces two broods in one year.
  • For more information please visit here…

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Anyone who has been around me for very long could probably figure out that one of my favorite all time colors is turquoise!  It just makes feel happy.  🙂  Maybe it quite coincidental or perhaps it’s from natural influences…

At Grinnell Glacier…IMG_1136

Glacial rivers…


St. Mary’s Falls in Glacier National Park…


Looking down on Grinnell Lake…IMG_1008

Another view with the sun hitting it…IMG_1051

The view of Josephine Lake, Swiftcurrent Lake, and Lake Sherburne…IMG_1112


Our wedding bands in Cancun…P1100314

Glorious beaches and turquoise water…P1100711

Mayian Ruins and the turquoise ocean…P1000376

An old dock going out to the ocean…P1100140

Sunrise on a Californian beach…11021435_788173817886293_2494865661392577813_o

Canadian Rockies and a glacial river…


Moraine Lake…


Glacial Ice


Lake Louise…


Hmmm…I’m awfully glad that world is filled with such vibrant color!

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Water World Wednesday

Yellow-rumped Warbler

WE had the pleasure of being by Fishercap Lake waiting for moose to come out when this handsome guy starting flying around.  I wasn’t sure what he was up to until I took the following pictures of him feeding a spider to… I am not sure if it’s a fledgling or a female or ?? But he was pretty entertaining watching him flutter about and pick spiders out of their webs in the trees…


Cool Facts

  • The Yellow-rumped Warbler is the only warbler able to digest the waxes found in bayberries and wax myrtles. Its ability to use these fruits allows it to winter farther north than other warblers, sometimes as far north as Newfoundland.
  • Male Yellow-rumped Warblers tend to forage higher in trees than females do.
  • Yellow-rumped Warblers are perhaps the most versatile foragers of all warblers. They’re the warbler you’re most likely to see fluttering out from a tree to catch a flying insect, and they’re also quick to switch over to eating berries in fall. Other places Yellow-rumped Warblers have been spotted foraging include picking at insects on washed-up seaweed at the beach, skimming insects from the surface of rivers and the ocean, picking them out of spiderwebs, and grabbing them off piles of manure.
  • When Yellow-rumped Warblers find themselves foraging with other warbler species, they typically let Palm, Magnolia and Black-throated Green warblers do as they wish, but they assert themselves over Pine and Blackburnian warblers.
  • The oldest known Yellow-rumped Warbler of the myrtle race was 8 years 9 months old. The oldest known individual of the “Audubon’s” race was 10 years old.

For more information please visit HERE

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American Robin…

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Cool Facts

  • An American Robin can produce three successful broods in one year. On average, though, only 40 percent of nests successfully produce young. Only 25 percent of those fledged young survive to November. From that point on, about half of the robins alive in any year will make it to the next. Despite the fact that a lucky robin can live to be 14 years old, the entire population turns over on average every six years.

  • Although robins are considered harbingers of spring, many American Robins spend the whole winter in their breeding range. But because they spend more time roosting in trees and less time in your yard, you’re much less likely to see them. The number of robins present in the northern parts of the range varies each year with the local conditions.

  • Robins eat a lot of fruit in fall and winter. When they eat honeysuckle berries exclusively, they sometimes become intoxicated.

  • Robin roosts can be huge, sometimes including a quarter-million birds during winter. In summer, females sleep at their nests and males gather at roosts. As young robins become independent, they join the males. Female adults go to the roosts only after they have finished nesting.

  • Robins eat different types of food depending on the time of day: more earthworms in the morning and more fruit later in the day. Because the robin forages largely on lawns, it is vulnerable to pesticide poisoning and can be an important indicator of chemical pollution.

  • The oldest recorded American Robin was 13 years and 11 months old.

For more information please go here…

Going on outside our office window…


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Wild Bird Wednesday

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Rurality Blog Hop #74

Sunday Out…

Our crew headed to Many Glaciers this past weekend.  We ended up hitting a pointy rock, popping a tire and having a flat, then after changing the tire and making it the rest of the way to Many Glacier it started to pour buckets and didn’t see any wildlife and couldn’t even get out of the car without getting soaked, so no hikes.  We decided we would head back home and then the kids ended up getting hungry, so we stopped a ways away in Two Medicine.  It was just cloudy there and we were able to enjoy a nice little picnic and do a little hiking and spotted many wildflowers and even a black bear.

At Two Medicine Lake, Glacier National Park…


On our little walk we discovered these gems.  A lot of these I’m not sure what they are… …IMG_9821 IMG_9825 IMG_9828

A big, fat Bumbler…IMG_9659

A Fairy Slipper, Calypso bulbosa…IMG_9835

Western Virgin’s Bower… Clematis occidentalis IMG_9840 IMG_9842

At the end of the hike was Running Eagle Falls, running at full bore.  Normally it’s just pouring out the cave in the middle of the falls…


Crossing the bridge…

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Holding daddy’s hand…IMG_9816

The kids showing off their heart-shaped rocks…IMG_9863 IMG_9866

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We also spotted a Black Bear…

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Dancing Aspens…



Lots of Shooting Stars..IMG_9895 IMG_9897 IMG_9902 IMG_9907 IMG_9914

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More Blue wildflowers…IMG_9928 IMG_9932 IMG_9935 IMG_9938 IMG_9940 IMG_9944

Cheers to long spring days spent in beautiful places…IMG_9862

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Macro Monday

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