Moose and calf…

In Many Glacier we are often blessed to be able to watch moose do their own thing.  We get to watch them graze the bottoms of lake beds and watch them bring their baby calves down to explore…IMG_5750 IMG_5744 IMG_5737 IMG_5720 IMG_5717 IMG_5797 IMG_5796 IMG_5793 IMG_5784 IMG_5775 IMG_5756 IMG_5751

Sharing with:

nature notes logo


Yellow-rumped Warbler

WE had the pleasure of being by Fishercap Lake waiting for moose to come out when this handsome guy starting flying around.  I wasn’t sure what he was up to until I took the following pictures of him feeding a spider to… I am not sure if it’s a fledgling or a female or ?? But he was pretty entertaining watching him flutter about and pick spiders out of their webs in the trees…


Cool Facts

  • The Yellow-rumped Warbler is the only warbler able to digest the waxes found in bayberries and wax myrtles. Its ability to use these fruits allows it to winter farther north than other warblers, sometimes as far north as Newfoundland.
  • Male Yellow-rumped Warblers tend to forage higher in trees than females do.
  • Yellow-rumped Warblers are perhaps the most versatile foragers of all warblers. They’re the warbler you’re most likely to see fluttering out from a tree to catch a flying insect, and they’re also quick to switch over to eating berries in fall. Other places Yellow-rumped Warblers have been spotted foraging include picking at insects on washed-up seaweed at the beach, skimming insects from the surface of rivers and the ocean, picking them out of spiderwebs, and grabbing them off piles of manure.
  • When Yellow-rumped Warblers find themselves foraging with other warbler species, they typically let Palm, Magnolia and Black-throated Green warblers do as they wish, but they assert themselves over Pine and Blackburnian warblers.
  • The oldest known Yellow-rumped Warbler of the myrtle race was 8 years 9 months old. The oldest known individual of the “Audubon’s” race was 10 years old.

For more information please visit HERE

IMG_2280 IMG_2281 IMG_2283 IMG_2284 IMG_2285 IMG_2286 IMG_2289

Linking up with Friends at…

Wild Bird Wednesday

The BIRD D’pot

nature notes logo

Immature Bald Eagle…


Cool Facts

  • Rather than do their own fishing, Bald Eagles often go after other creatures’ catches. A Bald Eagle will harass a hunting Osprey until the smaller raptor drops its prey in midair, where the eagle swoops it up. A Bald Eagle may even snatch a fish directly out of an Osprey’s talons. Fishing mammals (even people sometimes) can also lose prey to Bald Eagle piracy. See an example here.
  • Had Benjamin Franklin prevailed, the U.S. emblem might have been the Wild Turkey. In 1784, Franklin disparaged the national bird’s thieving tendencies and its vulnerability to harassment by small birds. “For my own part,” he wrote, “I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly. … Besides he is a rank Coward: The little King Bird not bigger than a Sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the District.”
  • Sometimes even the national bird has to cut loose. Bald Eagles have been known to play with plastic bottles and other objects pressed into service as toys. One observer witnessed six Bald Eagles passing sticks to each other in midair.
  • The largest Bald Eagle nest on record, in St. Petersburg, Florida, was 2.9 meters in diameter and 6.1 meters tall. Another famous nest—in Vermilion, Ohio—was shaped like a wine glass and weighed almost two metric tons. It was used for 34 years until the tree blew down.
  • Immature Bald Eagles spend the first four years of their lives in nomadic exploration of vast territories and can fly hundreds of miles per day. Some young birds from Florida have wandered north as far as Michigan, and birds from California have reached Alaska.
  • Bald Eagles can live a long time, with a longevity record of 28 years in the wild and 36 years in captivity.
  • Bald Eagles occasionally hunt cooperatively, with one individual flushing prey towards another.
  • For more info please visit here…


Linking up with Friends at…

Wild Bird Wednesday

The BIRD D’pot

nature notes logo

Barrow’s Goldeneye…

On a hike by Fishercap Lake in Many Glaciers…IMG_0131IMG_0120

We spotted a few female (what we believe to be ) Barrow’s Goldeneye…IMG_0097

They ended up getting a bit too close together and duck decided she didn’t want the other around…IMG_0093-Edit IMG_0092-Edit IMG_0091-Edit IMG_0090-Edit IMG_0089-Edit

And chased the other one away!IMG_0088-Edit

Cool Facts

  • The Barrow’s Goldeneye is rather long-lived for a duck, with one individual reaching 18 years of age. Most females do not breed until they are three years old.
  • Like the Common Goldeneye, the Barrow’s Goldeneye is not too particular about holding on to its own offspring. A female may lay eggs in the nest of another goldeneye or other species of cavity-nesting duck. Once the ducklings come out of the nest, the broods of different females often come together and are taken care of by a single female. The young ducklings are highly independent, feeding on their own, and require little parental care.
  • For a species with such widely separated populations, it is perhaps surprising that the Barrow’s Goldeneye shows little variation from place to place. Those breeding in North America are essentially identical on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Female Barrow’s Goldeneyes breeding in Iceland do not get as extensively yellow bills as the North American birds, but have only a yellow or orangish band on the outer third of the otherwise dusky bill.

For more information please visit Here…

Linking up with Friends at…

Wild Bird Wednesday

The BIRD D’pot

nature notes logo

Sunday Out…

Our crew headed to Many Glaciers this past weekend.  We ended up hitting a pointy rock, popping a tire and having a flat, then after changing the tire and making it the rest of the way to Many Glacier it started to pour buckets and didn’t see any wildlife and couldn’t even get out of the car without getting soaked, so no hikes.  We decided we would head back home and then the kids ended up getting hungry, so we stopped a ways away in Two Medicine.  It was just cloudy there and we were able to enjoy a nice little picnic and do a little hiking and spotted many wildflowers and even a black bear.

At Two Medicine Lake, Glacier National Park…


On our little walk we discovered these gems.  A lot of these I’m not sure what they are… …IMG_9821 IMG_9825 IMG_9828

A big, fat Bumbler…IMG_9659

A Fairy Slipper, Calypso bulbosa…IMG_9835

Western Virgin’s Bower… Clematis occidentalis IMG_9840 IMG_9842

At the end of the hike was Running Eagle Falls, running at full bore.  Normally it’s just pouring out the cave in the middle of the falls…


Crossing the bridge…

IMG_9809 IMG_9812 IMG_9813

Holding daddy’s hand…IMG_9816

The kids showing off their heart-shaped rocks…IMG_9863 IMG_9866

IMG_9872 IMG_9870

We also spotted a Black Bear…

IMG_9675 IMG_9690 IMG_9699

Dancing Aspens…



Lots of Shooting Stars..IMG_9895 IMG_9897 IMG_9902 IMG_9907 IMG_9914

IMG_9889IMG_9920 IMG_9922 IMG_9926

More Blue wildflowers…IMG_9928 IMG_9932 IMG_9935 IMG_9938 IMG_9940 IMG_9944

Cheers to long spring days spent in beautiful places…IMG_9862

Linking up with 🙂

Macro Monday

Macro Monday Mixer

 Today’s Flowers

Inspire Me Monday

 photo 4d06e438-4e6a-4f3b-88b2-0c1093350397_zps361ad0e9.jpg

Shine the Divine