Turquoise…

Anyone who has been around me for very long could probably figure out that one of my favorite all time colors is turquoise!  It just makes feel happy.  🙂  Maybe it quite coincidental or perhaps it’s from natural influences…

At Grinnell Glacier…IMG_1136

Glacial rivers…

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St. Mary’s Falls in Glacier National Park…

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Looking down on Grinnell Lake…IMG_1008

Another view with the sun hitting it…IMG_1051

The view of Josephine Lake, Swiftcurrent Lake, and Lake Sherburne…IMG_1112

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Our wedding bands in Cancun…P1100314

Glorious beaches and turquoise water…P1100711

Mayian Ruins and the turquoise ocean…P1000376

An old dock going out to the ocean…P1100140

Sunrise on a Californian beach…11021435_788173817886293_2494865661392577813_o

Canadian Rockies and a glacial river…

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Moraine Lake…

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Glacial Ice

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Lake Louise…

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Hmmm…I’m awfully glad that world is filled with such vibrant color!

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The Icefields Parkway In Banff & Jasper National Park

Earlier this fall my husband and I had the opportunity to stay in Jasper, Alberta in Jasper National Park.  We had to be home in Kalispell, MT the next day.  We had a whirlwind day with lots of stops, picture taking and rushing.  Definitely not ideal but it was so neat to see the glacial icefields and various other sights along the way.  Today I’ll share with you all the one stop at the Icefields, that my husband in particular was very excited to see…

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The cool blue, turquoise glacial ice was beautiful…IMG_1076

Some rocks with glacial striations…IMG_1120 IMG_1123

Rugged mountain peaks…IMG_1127-Edit IMG_1131

More glacial striations!  It’s unimaginable the amount of pressure and force of the ice to make these marks  on these rocks, let alone that they carved these valley out…IMG_1132-Edit

The icefield…

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More turquoise glacial ice…IMG_1154-Edit IMG_1159

Picture opportunity…         IMG_1164

A tour bus going up the steep mountain side up to the glacier…

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Glacial snow covered in pebbles that were carried in the l layers of snow that use to be above the snow/ice but have now melted.  It’s quite a thing to think about the water flowing besides the ice and wonder when it was in liquid form last?IMG_1179-Edit

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The beautiful scenery was breathtaking! IMG_1220-Edit

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Turquoise….

These bighorn sheep are beside a naturally turquoise lake formed by glacial rock flour…IMG_0197Blue, frozen glacial ice…IMG_1057-Edit IMG_0931 IMG_0992-Edit

Got Milk?. . .
The beautiful turquoise color shown in the photo is the true color of the water. Sometimes called “glacial milk”, the unusual color is due to the presence of “rock flour”, which consists of tiny clay particles formed as rocks stuck to the bottom and sides of a glacier grind against bedrock. This abrasion reduces some of the bedrock to a fine powder that looks like the flour used to make bread. As the ice melts this rock flour is exposed and transported away by meltwater, often into a nearby tarn.

They won’t settle down! . . . .
Meltwater also transports pebbles, sand, and silt into the lake, but these larger rock particles quickly settle to the bottom of the lake. In contrast, the much smaller particles of rock flour remain suspended in the water until the fall when the meltwater stops flowing or the lake freezes over. Only then does the water become calm enough to let rock flour settle to the bottom. A core sample from the middle of the lake would probably reveal alternating layers of silt and clay called “varves”. . . . One layer of each (varve) for every year the lake has been in existence.

Why so blue? . . .
Sunlight includes many different wavelengths of light ranging from the longer “reds” to the shorter “violets” (ROYGBIV). A white T-shirt is white because it reflects all of the wavelengths, a black shirt is colorless because it absorbs all of the wavelengths, and a red shirt is red because it absorbs the OYGBIV and reflects the R (red wavelengths). Apparently the tiny particles of rock flour suspended in the lake are just the right size to reflect more of the blues and some of the greens than any of the other wavelengths.

Information from formontana.net

Visit here for more info…

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