Bleary-eyed but here…

The perk benefit of staying up all night with ewes in labor?  Enjoying a gorgeous Montana sunrise…

sunrise

 

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Victoria with her new ewe lamb, Gypsy.

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Lots of watching, waiting and coffee…

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Gypsy

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Black sheep of the family.

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Carly’s lamb pile-up!

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Garrett getting a little snuggle…

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Another pile-up!

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Going strong!

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Momma, I found this comfy, warm bed just for me!

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Going for a ride and getting weighed in the bag.

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Jug crawler…

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Never off duty…

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Wait for me mommy…

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Beautiful badgerfaced ewe lamb.

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Lamb kisses.

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Handsome Gotland/Icelandic cross.

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Stare down.

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Hide out.

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Is she gone?

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Lamb love!

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Gia and her momma.

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Pregnant…

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Freckles

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Run, jump and play!

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Sunning himself.

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Love his smile!

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Tiny set of twins.

 

 

 

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Flashy boys.

 

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Lots of stormy skies lately…

 

Linking up with friends at:

LITTLE THINGS THURSDAY

Thursday Favorite Things Blog Hop

Skywatch Friday

The Chicken Chick

Homestead Barn Hop,The Backyard Farming Connection,

 Camera Critters,  Farmgirl Friday,

From The Farm Blog Hop

 

The Self Sufficient HomeAcre

 

MeadowLark…

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Cool Facts

  • The nest of the Western Meadowlark usually is partially covered by a grass roof. It may be completely open, however, or it may have a complete roof and an entrance tunnel several feet long.
  • Although the Western Meadowlark looks nearly identical to the Eastern Meadowlark, the two species hybridize only very rarely. Mixed pairs usually occur only at the edge of the range where few mates are available. Captive breeding experiments found that hybrid meadowlarks were fertile, but produced few eggs that hatched.
  • A male Western Meadowlark usually has two mates at the same time. The females do all the incubation and brooding, and most of the feeding of the young.
  • The explorer Meriwether Lewis was the first to point out the subtle differences between the birds that would eventually be known as the Eastern and Western Meadowlarks, noting in June 1805 that the tail and bill shapes as well as the song of the Western Meadowlark differed from what was then known as the “oldfield lark” in the Eastern United States.
  • John James Audubon gave the Western Meadowlark its scientific name, Sturnella(starling-like) neglecta, claiming that most explorers and settlers who ventured west of the Mississippi after Lewis and Clark had overlooked this common bird.
  • In 1914, California grain growers initiated one of the earliest studies of the Western Meadowlark’s diet to determine whether the bird could be designated a pest species. Although they do eat grain, Western Meadowlarks also help limit numbers of crop-damaging insects.
  • Like other members of the blackbird, or icterid, family, meadowlarks use a feeding behavior called “gaping,” which relies on the unusually strong muscles that open their bill. They insert their bill into the soil, bark or other substrate, then force it open to create a hole. This gives meadowlarks access to insects and other food items that most birds can’t reach.
  • The Western Meadowlark is the state bird of six states: Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, and Wyoming. Only the Northern Cardinal is a more popular civic symbol, edging out the meadowlark by one state.
  • More information can be found here

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Wild Bird WednesdayThe BIRD D’pot

NatureFootstep,  Macro Monday

Shine the Divine

Fabulous Day…

 

We spent a wonderful spring day moving sheds to the lambing paddock.  Only a week left until we should start seeing lambs!

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While dad moved sheds the kids had wheelbarrow rides…

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The sheep romped…

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and ate…

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Dugur watched…

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and the chickens did… chicken things.

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Linking up with friends at:

The Chicken Chick

Homestead Barn Hop,The Backyard Farming Connection,

 Camera Critters,  Farmgirl Friday,

From The Farm Blog Hop

 

The Self Sufficient HomeAcre