By the Light of the Moon…

We have had so many cloudy nights this entire winter, I was starting to wonder what a star filled sky looked like.  On Friday we had one of our first clear nights so we headed up to Glacier…_Z3A6701

Star Trails…IMG_7475

 

Big Dipper over Lake McDonald…

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Clear night, clear water…IMG_7474

 

Belton Bridge lit up by the moon…IMG_7494

 

The view from the bridge…IMG_7502

 

Linking up with…

Friendship Friday

Water World Wednesday

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Spring Glow…

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Cool Facts About the Blue Heron

  • Thanks to specially shaped neck vertebrae, Great Blue Herons can curl their neck into an S shape for a more aerodynamic flight profile and to quickly strike prey at a distance.
  • Great Blue Herons have specialized feathers on their chest that continually grow and fray. The herons comb this “powder down” with a fringed claw on their middle toes, using the down like a washcloth to remove fish slime and other oils from their feathers as they preen. Applying the powder to their underparts protects their feathers against the slime and oils of swamps.
  • Great Blue Herons can hunt day and night thanks to a high percentage of rod-type photoreceptors in their eyes that improve their night vision.
  • Despite their impressive size, Great Blue Herons weigh only 5 to 6 pounds thanks in part to their hollow bones—a feature all birds share.
  • Great Blue Herons in the northeastern U.S. and southern Canada have benefited from the recovery of beaver populations, which have created a patchwork of swamps and meadows well-suited to foraging and nesting.
  • Along the Pacific coast, it’s not unusual to see a Great Blue Heron poised atop a floating bed of kelp waiting for a meal to swim by.
  • The white form of the Great Blue Heron, known as the “great white heron,” is found nearly exclusively in shallow marine waters along the coast of very southern Florida, the Yucatan Peninsula, and in the Caribbean. Where the dark and white forms overlap in Florida, intermediate birds known as “Wurdemann’s herons” can be found. They have the body of a Great Blue Heron, but the white head and neck of the great white heron.
  • The oldest Great Blue Heron, based on banding recovery, was 24 years old.
  • Great Blue Herons congregate at fish hatcheries, creating potential problems for the fish farmers. A study found that herons ate mostly diseased fish that would have died shortly anyway. Sick fish spent more time near the surface of the water where they were more vulnerable to the herons.

For more information, please visit here...

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Linking up with:

Wild Bird Wednesday and The BIRD D’pot

Walk Down the Dirt Road…

The muddy, dirt road filled with puddles and the naked aspen trees are awaiting springs warmth…

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Wade through the puddles…IMG_8936

View the beautiful mountains…

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Enjoy the setting sun…

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Down the road farther…

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Mountains surround…

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Back home…

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The puddles are starting to freeze up…

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The setting sun between the aspens…

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The flooded pasture…

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From above…

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The view towards home…

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Content creatures…

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Back home in time to enjoy the grand finale…

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Blessed joy…

 

 

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Rurality Blog Hop #54