By the Light of the Moon…

We have had so many cloudy nights this entire winter, I was starting to wonder what a star filled sky looked like.  On Friday we had one of our first clear nights so we headed up to Glacier…_Z3A6701

Star Trails…IMG_7475

 

Big Dipper over Lake McDonald…

_Z3A6730

 

Clear night, clear water…IMG_7474

 

Belton Bridge lit up by the moon…IMG_7494

 

The view from the bridge…IMG_7502

 

Linking up with…

Friendship Friday

Water World Wednesday

Advertisements

Along the Firehole River…

On our recent trip to Yellowstone, we stopped to have a bit of a break and a picnic on the Firehole River….

P1030301

The kids were able to explore the river and splash around a bit…

IMG_4138

 

IMG_4141 IMG_4129

A curious on-looker begging for food….

 

IMG_4133 P1030276 P1030288

 

Even a chance for a nap…P1030278

Sisters…P1030286

A “Camp Robber” decided to check things out too…

P1030338

Otherwise known as, Clark’s Nutcracker, they are friendly, curious little guys…

P1030316 P1030308 P1030317 P1030322

Cool Facts

  • The Clark’s Nutcracker has a special pouch under its tongue that it uses to carry seeds long distances. The nutcracker harvests seeds from pine trees and takes them away to hide them for later use.
  • The Clark’s Nutcracker hides thousands and thousands of seeds each year. Laboratory studies have shown that the bird has a tremendous memory and can remember where to find most of the seeds it hides.
  • The Clark’s Nutcracker feeds its nestlings pine seeds from its many winter stores (caches). Because it feeds the young on stored seeds, the nutcracker can breed as early as January or February, despite the harsh winter weather in its mountain home.
  • The Clark’s Nutcracker is one of very few members of the crow family where the male incubates the eggs. In jays and crows, taking care of the eggs is for the female only. But the male nutcracker actually develops a brood patch on its chest just like the female, and takes his turn keeping the eggs warm while the female goes off to get seeds out of her caches.
  • Not only do the lives of Clark’s Nutcrackers revolve around their pine seed diet, but the pines themselves have been shaped by their relationship with the nutcrackers. Whitebark pines, limber pines, Colorado pinyon pines, single-leaf pinyon pines, and southwestern white pines depend on nutcrackers to disperse their seeds. Over time this interaction has changed their seeds, their cones, and even the trees’ overall shape in comparison with other pine species whose seeds are dispersed by the wind.
  • The Clark’s Nutcracker tests a seed for soundness by moving it up and down in its bill while quickly opening and closing its bill, in a motion known as “bill clicking.” It also chooses good seeds by color: when foraging on Colorado pinyon pines, it refuses all but dark brown seeds.
  • Ounce for ounce, the whitebark pine seeds that many Clark’s Nutcrackers depend on have more calories than chocolate.
  • Clark’s Nutcracker is in the crow and jay family—but the first time Captain William Clark saw one, in August of 1805, he thought it was a woodpecker. He and Meriwether Lewis collected a specimen in Idaho on their return journey a year later. Clark’s Nutcracker was one of three new bird species brought back from their expedition, all of which were described by the naturalist Alexander Wilson.
  • The oldest Clark’s Nutcracker on record was at least 17 years, 5 months old.

For more information please visit, here…

P1030332 P1030341

Linking up with friends at:

Wild Bird WednesdayThe BIRD D’pot

 

Nature Notes