Spring Glow…

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Cool Facts About the Blue Heron

  • Thanks to specially shaped neck vertebrae, Great Blue Herons can curl their neck into an S shape for a more aerodynamic flight profile and to quickly strike prey at a distance.
  • Great Blue Herons have specialized feathers on their chest that continually grow and fray. The herons comb this “powder down” with a fringed claw on their middle toes, using the down like a washcloth to remove fish slime and other oils from their feathers as they preen. Applying the powder to their underparts protects their feathers against the slime and oils of swamps.
  • Great Blue Herons can hunt day and night thanks to a high percentage of rod-type photoreceptors in their eyes that improve their night vision.
  • Despite their impressive size, Great Blue Herons weigh only 5 to 6 pounds thanks in part to their hollow bones—a feature all birds share.
  • Great Blue Herons in the northeastern U.S. and southern Canada have benefited from the recovery of beaver populations, which have created a patchwork of swamps and meadows well-suited to foraging and nesting.
  • Along the Pacific coast, it’s not unusual to see a Great Blue Heron poised atop a floating bed of kelp waiting for a meal to swim by.
  • The white form of the Great Blue Heron, known as the “great white heron,” is found nearly exclusively in shallow marine waters along the coast of very southern Florida, the Yucatan Peninsula, and in the Caribbean. Where the dark and white forms overlap in Florida, intermediate birds known as “Wurdemann’s herons” can be found. They have the body of a Great Blue Heron, but the white head and neck of the great white heron.
  • The oldest Great Blue Heron, based on banding recovery, was 24 years old.
  • Great Blue Herons congregate at fish hatcheries, creating potential problems for the fish farmers. A study found that herons ate mostly diseased fish that would have died shortly anyway. Sick fish spent more time near the surface of the water where they were more vulnerable to the herons.

For more information, please visit here...

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Linking up with:

Wild Bird Wednesday and The BIRD D’pot

A Little Evening Walk with the Sheep…

Victoria and Madeline walking their 4-H fair lambs every evening…

 

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Most of the time they have a little shadow…

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Up and down the big hill, it helps exercise the lambs and builds their muscles…it helps exercise the girls too!  ;0)

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Then they practice setting them up…

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And getting them to brace…IMG_1974

Hard to believe we have fair lambs already.   I don’t even want to think forward to fair which means fall is just right around the corner but I’m sure it will be here sooner than I am ready for it…

Sharing with:

Rurality Blog Hop #60

Window Pains…

 

Sooo, the story goes like this…

Earlier this winter, I was in the kitchen working on supper.  I could hear the little’s playing in the living room when I heard a huge bang with glass shattering.  Of course the first thing that pops into this mamma’s head is that someone fell through the window.  So I run into the living room and see all the little’s sitting with stunned looks on their faces and then I look around to see what broke.  Then something brown on the porch caught my attention as it jumped up and then ran away.  It was a wild turkey and she had apparently tried to fly through one of our large windows.  She managed to break the outside pane of the window, she herself seemed to be a bit dazed but managed to fly away.

 

Fast forward to last week, when once again I hear a large thud against a window.  Thankfully, no shattering glass this time though!  The kids were doing school work out there and yelled at me to grab my camera and come look at what hit the other large glass window in the living room…

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I believe he is a Cooper’s Hawk.

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Cool Facts

  • Dashing through vegetation to catch birds is a dangerous lifestyle. In a study of more than 300 Cooper’s Hawk skeletons, 23 percent showed old, healed-over fractures in the bones of the chest, especially of the furcula, or wishbone.
  • A Cooper’s Hawk captures a bird with its feet and kills it by repeated squeezing. Falcons tend to kill their prey by biting it, but Cooper’s Hawks hold their catch away from the body until it dies. They’ve even been known to drown their prey, holding a bird underwater until it stopped moving.
  • Once thought averse to towns and cities, Cooper’s Hawks are now fairly common urban and suburban birds. Some studies show their numbers are actually higher in towns than in their natural habitat, forests. Cities provide plenty of Rock Pigeon and Mourning Dove prey. Though one study in Arizona found a downside to the high-dove diet: Cooper’s Hawk nestlings suffered from a parasitic disease they acquired from eating dove meat.
  • Life is tricky for male Cooper’s Hawks. As in most hawks, males are significantly smaller than their mates. The danger is that female Cooper’s Hawks specialize in eating medium-sized birds. Males tend to be submissive to females and to listen out for reassuring call notes the females make when they’re willing to be approached. Males build the nest, then provide nearly all the food to females and young over the next 90 days before the young fledge.
  • The oldest known Cooper’s Hawk was 20 years, 4 months old.

For more information visit here….
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After getting over the initial shock of hitting the window, he eventually took off.  Poor guy!  On occasion we have had a few small birds hit our windows, but these bigger birds are quite surprising when they do!

Linking up with:

Wild Bird WednesdayThe BIRD D’pot

MeadowLark…

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Cool Facts

  • The nest of the Western Meadowlark usually is partially covered by a grass roof. It may be completely open, however, or it may have a complete roof and an entrance tunnel several feet long.
  • Although the Western Meadowlark looks nearly identical to the Eastern Meadowlark, the two species hybridize only very rarely. Mixed pairs usually occur only at the edge of the range where few mates are available. Captive breeding experiments found that hybrid meadowlarks were fertile, but produced few eggs that hatched.
  • A male Western Meadowlark usually has two mates at the same time. The females do all the incubation and brooding, and most of the feeding of the young.
  • The explorer Meriwether Lewis was the first to point out the subtle differences between the birds that would eventually be known as the Eastern and Western Meadowlarks, noting in June 1805 that the tail and bill shapes as well as the song of the Western Meadowlark differed from what was then known as the “oldfield lark” in the Eastern United States.
  • John James Audubon gave the Western Meadowlark its scientific name, Sturnella(starling-like) neglecta, claiming that most explorers and settlers who ventured west of the Mississippi after Lewis and Clark had overlooked this common bird.
  • In 1914, California grain growers initiated one of the earliest studies of the Western Meadowlark’s diet to determine whether the bird could be designated a pest species. Although they do eat grain, Western Meadowlarks also help limit numbers of crop-damaging insects.
  • Like other members of the blackbird, or icterid, family, meadowlarks use a feeding behavior called “gaping,” which relies on the unusually strong muscles that open their bill. They insert their bill into the soil, bark or other substrate, then force it open to create a hole. This gives meadowlarks access to insects and other food items that most birds can’t reach.
  • The Western Meadowlark is the state bird of six states: Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, and Wyoming. Only the Northern Cardinal is a more popular civic symbol, edging out the meadowlark by one state.
  • More information can be found here

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Wild Bird WednesdayThe BIRD D’pot

NatureFootstep,  Macro Monday

Shine the Divine

Fabulous Day…

 

We spent a wonderful spring day moving sheds to the lambing paddock.  Only a week left until we should start seeing lambs!

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While dad moved sheds the kids had wheelbarrow rides…

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The sheep romped…

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and ate…

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Dugur watched…

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and the chickens did… chicken things.

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Linking up with friends at:

The Chicken Chick

Homestead Barn Hop,The Backyard Farming Connection,

 Camera Critters,  Farmgirl Friday,

From The Farm Blog Hop

 

The Self Sufficient HomeAcre