Pond-Side…

A beautiful, little pond nestled in Bigfork…IMG_4329 IMG_4349 IMG_4353 IMG_4356 IMG_4357 IMG_4358 IMG_4361 IMG_4365 IMG_4366 IMG_4369 IMG_4370 IMG_4371 IMG_4372 IMG_4374

Dragon Fly resting in the tall grass, his wings almost looked fake…IMG_4448

A fuzzy caterpillar hiding on a thistle…IMG_4461 IMG_4499 IMG_4518 IMG_4532 IMG_4555

A view clear across the pond to the mountains…IMG_4571

A Great Blue Heron landed for a few minutes…IMG_4379-Edit IMG_4385 IMG_4388

A beautiful morning on the pond.

Linking up with:

Water World Wednesday

Wild Bird Wednesday

The BIRD D’pot

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Rurality Blog Hop #74

Around a Pond

While driving to Many Glaciers, my poor, tired husband needed a bit of a nap.  He pulled over here and took quick nap while I  got out to explore a bit…

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The Aspens trees were just leafing out…

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Some Mallards…IMG_3928-Edit

Bufflehead ducks..IMG_4555-Edit IMG_3980-Edit

Glacier Lilies…

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Linking up with:

Wild Bird Wednesday and The BIRD D’pot

Spring Glow…

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Cool Facts About the Blue Heron

  • Thanks to specially shaped neck vertebrae, Great Blue Herons can curl their neck into an S shape for a more aerodynamic flight profile and to quickly strike prey at a distance.
  • Great Blue Herons have specialized feathers on their chest that continually grow and fray. The herons comb this “powder down” with a fringed claw on their middle toes, using the down like a washcloth to remove fish slime and other oils from their feathers as they preen. Applying the powder to their underparts protects their feathers against the slime and oils of swamps.
  • Great Blue Herons can hunt day and night thanks to a high percentage of rod-type photoreceptors in their eyes that improve their night vision.
  • Despite their impressive size, Great Blue Herons weigh only 5 to 6 pounds thanks in part to their hollow bones—a feature all birds share.
  • Great Blue Herons in the northeastern U.S. and southern Canada have benefited from the recovery of beaver populations, which have created a patchwork of swamps and meadows well-suited to foraging and nesting.
  • Along the Pacific coast, it’s not unusual to see a Great Blue Heron poised atop a floating bed of kelp waiting for a meal to swim by.
  • The white form of the Great Blue Heron, known as the “great white heron,” is found nearly exclusively in shallow marine waters along the coast of very southern Florida, the Yucatan Peninsula, and in the Caribbean. Where the dark and white forms overlap in Florida, intermediate birds known as “Wurdemann’s herons” can be found. They have the body of a Great Blue Heron, but the white head and neck of the great white heron.
  • The oldest Great Blue Heron, based on banding recovery, was 24 years old.
  • Great Blue Herons congregate at fish hatcheries, creating potential problems for the fish farmers. A study found that herons ate mostly diseased fish that would have died shortly anyway. Sick fish spent more time near the surface of the water where they were more vulnerable to the herons.

For more information, please visit here...

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Linking up with:

Wild Bird Wednesday and The BIRD D’pot