Moving…

 

On Sunday, it was time to move sheep to new pasture.  Their current pasture had been grazed down pretty well.

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When Mark had went to open up the gate to the new pasture he found this little guy…

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It appeared to have an injured wing and we didn’t want it to get crushed by the hooves of the sheep.  It was moved several feet away, to the adjoining pasture that didn’t have grazers in it.  The kids thought it was pretty cool!

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Let the moving commence, out of the old pasture, across the road…

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Through the gate and into the new pasture…

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Lots of tall, green grass here…

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Scattering a bit, in search of goodies!

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Happy Day!

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Harrowing away…

I am not sure who was happier to see the harrow going…my husband with a little tractor therapy…

Mark, working the pasture and moving the "solids" around.

or the chickens.  🙂

Chickens digging through...

Every time I looked up and seen my husband, he was grinning ear to ear.  Yup, good therapy.

Going round and round...

Everyone was happy and content.

Audna checking out what the chickens were up to.

With spring around the corner and the pasture coming back to life, it really needed the little piles of hay and dropping spread out.  The sheep are fairly good about getting the fertilizer spread out evenly but the llamas and horse have their own little areas that build up and eventually kill the grass.

Happy rooster...

Harrowing needs to be done fairly routinely here and after 5  months of freezing weather it really needed to be done this spring.

scratch...scratch...scratch

Happy harrowers. 🙂

A lovely end to the day.

Linking up with

Homestead Barn Hop #53

Sainfoin…

What is it? Well according to the University of Wyoming

 

Sainfoin is an extremely palatable and nutritious forage crop. It is preferred over other forage species by cattle, sheep and deer. It matures faster than alfalfa providing early spring forage.
 

Onobrychis viciifolia Scop., is a member of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae) family. It is native to regions around the Mediterranean, Black and Caspian Seas and north into Russia. It has been cultivated in Europe for at least 450 years. Sainfoin was introduced from Turkey into the northern Great Plains of the U.S. in Montana and North Dakota in the 1960s. From these early introductions, varieties of sainfoin released by Montana State University included ‘Eski’ in 1964 and ‘Remont’ in 1971. .

Sainfoin is similar to alfalfa in feed value. Both can be cut and baled at 10% bloom. However, unlike alfalfa, sainfoin can be grazed as it does not cause bloat in ruminant animals. Sainfoin can be used for wildlife habitat restoration, for wildlife enhancement as a component with other forage species or as a legume component under the Conservation Reserve Program. Due to extreme palatability and limited acreage of sainfoin, deer fencing was required at several test sites in Wyoming and Montana in order to obtain seed and forage production data. Beekeepers indicate honey yields with sainfoin are much greater than from alfalfa.
 

 

Mark no-tilled in some sainfoin this spring into a portion of our pasture.  Not only do the sheep and bees love it but it is beautiful to look at too!  Here at the end of September it is still a dark green color while the rest of the pasture is pretty much dead.  I am sure if we had sheep in this pasture right now we would not be able to keep them out of it.

Bees in sainfoin.

More bees

Sainfoin Flower

Sainfoin Field

Goings on…

Another beauty...

Another beauty...

We have been having problems with a couple of sheep being renegades and crawling through the portable fence.  So this week Sawyer and I brought back all the sheep and sorted out all the trouble makers.  They then ended up staying in the main pasture for a couple of days due to being busy haying and then yesterday the kids and Iwere able to get them pushed back over to the portable fencing where there is more grass.  So last night Mark went over to check the voltage on the wires and to check on what it would take to put a perment fence in over there.  There is already a fence in place that looks pretty good, with the exception of the east side that is almost completly down but still has all the posts and most of the wire.  For the rest of the pasture it looks like we’ll just need to put in a couple of new post, insulators and one more round of wire to keep them in.  We then could do some rotational grazing, and then if someone popped through the temporary  fence we wouldn’t have to worry so much about them getting into the neighbors yards as all of them seem to respect the main fence (with 7000+ volts) running through it.  Mark also GPS’ed the garden and found out it was 4/10ths of an acre.

Icelandic ewes...

Icelandic ewes...

So last night I was able to ride the property lines with Mark as he checked on the fencing situation and GPS’ed the whole thing.  When we got back to the house the littlest boys where wanting a ride so off they went with Mark.  Zayne was too cute, his little eyes would get real big and he would smile and then wave.  When it was all done he got so mad to have to get off.  I’m not sure if that’s a good thing! (Him being so little and already thinking the 4-wheeler is so fun!)

Mark and the little boys...

Mark and the little boys...

Growing lambs…

This time of year we are busy moving sheep, trying to keep them on fresh pasture and trying to keep the grass growing.   Ewes are fattening back up after growing lambs.  Lambs are growing and developing and just changing.  I was busy taking a couple of pictures last night and this morning and decided to update the pictures of  the lambs…
Bandit is turning out to be such a nice ram with his wide horns, lovely fleece and great confirmation...

Bandit a horned spotted moorit ram Icelandic lamb...

Bandit is turning out to be such a nice ram with his wide horns, lovely fleece and great conformation.

Beautiful Bianca...

Beautiful Bianca...

Bianca is turning out simply beautiful in her chocolate moorit fleece…

Black Licorice is a black grey horned Icelandic ram lamb...

Black Licorice is a black grey horned Icelandic ram lamb...

Black Licorice is nearly the size of his mother and is growing so nicely, he is incredibly stout in build and has such thick wide horns.  His fleece is tremendously thick and very soft.

Briar is a black grey ewe lamb...

Briar is a black grey ewe lamb...

Briar looks somewhat like a clown with her little ruffle.

Beau is a moorit grey mouflon ram lamb...

Beau is a moorit grey mouflon ram lamb...

Beau is living up to his name of beautiful.  He has the prettiest fleece and has excellent confirmation.

Tori in with the animals...

Tori in with the animals...

Before we moved the sheep this last time Tori had to catch Butterscotch as the terrain is becoming a little more steep, maybe too steep for the calf.

The hillside...

The hillside...

Blink is a black spotted ram lamb...

Blink is a black spotted ram lamb...

I just love his black and white horns! 

Brindle is a spotted moorit grey ewe...

Brindle is a spotted moorit grey ewe...

I just love her color and her pattern, she is the only brown spotted ewe we ended up with this year.

Bistro is a black horned ram lamb with flashing...

Bistro is a black horned ram lamb with flashing...

Bistro was the one who had the three terrible abscesses in his cheek from the cheat grass.  Look at how well he has healed!

Bliss is a black grey ewe lamb...

Bliss is a black grey ewe lamb...

I was so excited when Bliss arrived, I had always wanted an Icelandic sheep that was grey and we ended up having two solid black grey ewe lambs this year!

Dugur busy watching the flock...

Dugur busy watching the flock...

I hope to take a few more pictures of the other lambs and update them too.

Relief…

Sunday evening while putting the sheep behind their netting for the night, the sky let loose causing Sawyer and I to  get drenched!  As I awoke through out the night I could still hear the pitter-patter on the roof and smiled to myself.  We have not had a lot of *hot* days during the past two months, just not not much in the form of precipitation.  Dry land hay is about burnt out for the year here  and we’re not even to July yet! 

In the morning everything was so green and beautiful!  We even had puddles in the driveway…

Puddles in the road...
Puddles in the road…
Some pictures from around the place…
Peony buds with rain droplets...

Peony buds with rain droplets...

~*~
Rain water collected in a cabbage leaf...

Rain water collected in a cabbage leaf...

Our high for Monday was 58 degrees.
Sinking in mud...

Sinking in mud...

I spent a good portion of the day weeding in the garden with a sweat shirt and stocking cap!
Our scarecrow dancing amongst the strawberries...

Our scarecrow dancing amongst the strawberries...

~*~
Nearly 7/10ths!

Nearly 7/10ths!

This will definitely help to rejuvenate our pasture.