Turquoise…

Anyone who has been around me for very long could probably figure out that one of my favorite all time colors is turquoise!  It just makes feel happy.  🙂  Maybe it quite coincidental or perhaps it’s from natural influences…

At Grinnell Glacier…IMG_1136

Glacial rivers…

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St. Mary’s Falls in Glacier National Park…

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Looking down on Grinnell Lake…IMG_1008

Another view with the sun hitting it…IMG_1051

The view of Josephine Lake, Swiftcurrent Lake, and Lake Sherburne…IMG_1112

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Our wedding bands in Cancun…P1100314

Glorious beaches and turquoise water…P1100711

Mayian Ruins and the turquoise ocean…P1000376

An old dock going out to the ocean…P1100140

Sunrise on a Californian beach…11021435_788173817886293_2494865661392577813_o

Canadian Rockies and a glacial river…

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Moraine Lake…

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Glacial Ice

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Lake Louise…

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Hmmm…I’m awfully glad that world is filled with such vibrant color!

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Friendship Friday

Water World Wednesday

A Stellar Guy…

This guy decided to visit one morning while we were making breakfast in a campground in Yellowstone National Park…IMG_6962

Cool Facts

  • Steller’s and Blue jays are the only North American jays with crests. The Blue Jay is expanding its range westward. Where they meet, the two species occasionally interbreed and produce hybrids.
  • Steller’s Jays have the dubious honor of being one of the most frequently misspelled names in all of bird watching. Up close, the bird’s dazzling mix of azure and blue is certainly stellar, but that’s not how you spell their name. Steller’s Jays were discovered on an Alaskan island in 1741 by Georg Steller, a naturalist on a Russian explorer’s ship. When a scientist officially described the species, in 1788, they named it after him – along with other discoveries including the Steller’s sea lion and Steller’s Sea-Eagle.
  • The Steller’s Jay and the Blue Jay are the only New World jays that use mud to build their nests.
  • The Steller’s Jay shows a great deal of variation in appearance throughout its range, with some populations featuring black crests and backs, and others blue. One black-crested form in southern Mexico is surrounded by eight other blue-crested forms.
  • Steller’s Jays are habitual nest-robbers, like many other jay species. They’ve occasionally been seen attacking and killing small adult birds including a Pygmy Nuthatch and a Dark-eyed Junco.
  • An excellent mimic with a large repertoire, the Steller’s Jay can imitate birds, squirrels, cats, dogs, chickens, and some mechanical objects.
  • The oldest recorded Steller’s Jay was 16 years 1 month old.

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Barrow’s Goldeneye…

On a hike by Fishercap Lake in Many Glaciers…IMG_0131IMG_0120

We spotted a few female (what we believe to be ) Barrow’s Goldeneye…IMG_0097

They ended up getting a bit too close together and duck decided she didn’t want the other around…IMG_0093-Edit IMG_0092-Edit IMG_0091-Edit IMG_0090-Edit IMG_0089-Edit

And chased the other one away!IMG_0088-Edit

Cool Facts

  • The Barrow’s Goldeneye is rather long-lived for a duck, with one individual reaching 18 years of age. Most females do not breed until they are three years old.
  • Like the Common Goldeneye, the Barrow’s Goldeneye is not too particular about holding on to its own offspring. A female may lay eggs in the nest of another goldeneye or other species of cavity-nesting duck. Once the ducklings come out of the nest, the broods of different females often come together and are taken care of by a single female. The young ducklings are highly independent, feeding on their own, and require little parental care.
  • For a species with such widely separated populations, it is perhaps surprising that the Barrow’s Goldeneye shows little variation from place to place. Those breeding in North America are essentially identical on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Female Barrow’s Goldeneyes breeding in Iceland do not get as extensively yellow bills as the North American birds, but have only a yellow or orangish band on the outer third of the otherwise dusky bill.

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Evening Fishing…

We spent Sunday evening fishing and exploring the countryside…IMG_9513 IMG_9457

Dragon Flies…

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My Fishing crew…

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Water Lilies…

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Water Lilies…

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Little boys fishing…

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Frogs peaking out…

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Reflecting…

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Sego Lily…

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Sky reflecting on the pond…IMG_9363

Wild Iris…

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Wild Roses…

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Wild Iris…

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More water lilies…

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Great Blue Heron…

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Linking up with 🙂

Macro Monday

Macro Monday Mixer

 Today’s Flowers

Inspire Me Monday

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Shine the Divine

Western Tanager…

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Cool Facts

  • While most red birds owe their redness to a variety of plant pigments known as carotenoids, the Western Tanager gets its scarlet head feathers from a rare pigment called rhodoxanthin. Unable to make this substance in their own bodies, Western Tanagers probably obtain it from insects in their diet.
  • This species ranges farther north than any other tanager, breeding northward to a latitude of 60 degrees—into Canada’s Northwest Territories. In the chilly northernmost reaches of their breeding range, Western Tanagers may spend as little as two months before migrating south.
  • Male Western Tanagers sometimes perform an antic, eye-catching display, apparently a courtship ritual, in which they tumble past a female, their showy plumage flashing yellow and black.
  • Around the turn of the twentieth century, Western Tanagers were thought to pose a significant threat to commercial fruit crops. One observer wrote that in 1896, “the damage done to cherries in one orchard was so great that the sales of the fruit which was left did not balance the bills paid out for poison and ammunition.” Today, it is illegal to shoot native birds and Western Tanagers are safer than they were a century ago.
  • The oldest Western Tanager on record—a male originally banded in Nevada in 1965—had lived at least 6 years and 11 months by the time it was recaptured and rereleased in Oregon in 1971.
  • For more information visit here…

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Wild Bird Wednesday

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Eagle…

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Cool Facts

  • Rather than do their own fishing, Bald Eagles often go after other creatures’ catches. A Bald Eagle will harass a hunting Osprey until the smaller raptor drops its prey in midair, where the eagle swoops it up. A Bald Eagle may even snatch a fish directly out of an Osprey’s talons. Fishing mammals (even people sometimes) can also lose prey to Bald Eagle piracy. See an example here.
  • Had Benjamin Franklin prevailed, the U.S. emblem might have been the Wild Turkey. In 1784, Franklin disparaged the national bird’s thieving tendencies and its vulnerability to harassment by small birds. “For my own part,” he wrote, “I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly. … Besides he is a rank Coward: The little King Bird not bigger than a Sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the District.”
  • Sometimes even the national bird has to cut loose. Bald Eagles have been known to play with plastic bottles and other objects pressed into service as toys. One observer witnessed six Bald Eagles passing sticks to each other in midair.
  • The largest Bald Eagle nest on record, in St. Petersburg, Florida, was 2.9 meters in diameter and 6.1 meters tall. Another famous nest—in Vermilion, Ohio—was shaped like a wine glass and weighed almost two metric tons. It was used for 34 years until the tree blew down.
  • Immature Bald Eagles spend the first four years of their lives in nomadic exploration of vast territories and can fly hundreds of miles per day. Some young birds from Florida have wandered north as far as Michigan, and birds from California have reached Alaska.
  • Bald Eagles can live a long time, with a longevity record of 28 years in the wild and 36 years in captivity.
  • Bald Eagles occasionally hunt cooperatively, with one individual flushing prey towards another.
  • For more information visit here…

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Wild Bird Wednesday

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Rurality Blog Hop #74