Sunday Out…

Our crew headed to Many Glaciers this past weekend.  We ended up hitting a pointy rock, popping a tire and having a flat, then after changing the tire and making it the rest of the way to Many Glacier it started to pour buckets and didn’t see any wildlife and couldn’t even get out of the car without getting soaked, so no hikes.  We decided we would head back home and then the kids ended up getting hungry, so we stopped a ways away in Two Medicine.  It was just cloudy there and we were able to enjoy a nice little picnic and do a little hiking and spotted many wildflowers and even a black bear.

At Two Medicine Lake, Glacier National Park…

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On our little walk we discovered these gems.  A lot of these I’m not sure what they are… …IMG_9821 IMG_9825 IMG_9828

A big, fat Bumbler…IMG_9659

A Fairy Slipper, Calypso bulbosa…IMG_9835

Western Virgin’s Bower… Clematis occidentalis IMG_9840 IMG_9842

At the end of the hike was Running Eagle Falls, running at full bore.  Normally it’s just pouring out the cave in the middle of the falls…

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Crossing the bridge…

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Holding daddy’s hand…IMG_9816

The kids showing off their heart-shaped rocks…IMG_9863 IMG_9866

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We also spotted a Black Bear…

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Dancing Aspens…

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Lots of Shooting Stars..IMG_9895 IMG_9897 IMG_9902 IMG_9907 IMG_9914

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More Blue wildflowers…IMG_9928 IMG_9932 IMG_9935 IMG_9938 IMG_9940 IMG_9944

Cheers to long spring days spent in beautiful places…IMG_9862

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Shine the Divine

Ptarmigan…

This last summer/fall my husband and I took a little hike on Ptarmigan Trail in Glacier National Park…IMG_2104

It was a gorgeous, blue skied day with the autumn leaves just starting to change…IMG_1920

We spotted these little ptarmigan cross the trail in front of us…IMG_2128-Edit IMG_2132-Edit IMG_2133-Edit IMG_2137-Edit IMG_2140-Edit

Oh! And we seen this above the trail…

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Big ole sow grizzly snacking on berries…IMG_2019-Edit-Edit

What a beautiful day…IMG_1904-Edit-Edit

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Sunbathing…

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We spotted these two iguanas within a couple of yards within each other in Tulum, Mexico while looking at the Mayan ruins.  They seemed pretty happy to be perched above the ocean and soaking up the sun.  It was very neat to watch these guys, definitely something we wouldn’t  see in Montana!

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Yellowstone Grizzly…

 

On our 10 day camping trip to Yellowstone Park and Grand Tetons, we managed to see just about everything except for a grizzly bear.  At dusk, on the last day of our trip we spotted this beautiful bear…

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And the kids viewing from the top of the van…

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Rurality Blog Hop #36

While hiking…

We ran into this guy…

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I mean, we really about ran into him.  The trail went right beside him and it was very steep and bushy, no way to go up higher to get around him.  Moose scare me a bit more than bears.  Thankfully, it was  not a mama with a calf.  We all scurried quickly and quietly past this guy (9 kids along with my husband, my folks and myself) .  The little kids kept on going up the trail while a few of us stayed behind and definitely kept our distance from him and took a couple of quick shots…

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Not a very good picture above but I love the duck swimming next to him!

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These closer ones were taken first and the more distant ones where taken later from across the lake.IMG_3835 P1020273 P1020284 P1020365 P1020389

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Good Morning…

 

Last night’s beautiful moon!  Can you imagine hiking to the top of mountain by moonlight?  That’s what Sawyer and his buddies did this morning or maybe call it last night, where-ever 2 a.m. fits in that time frame.  They hiked to the top of Mt. Aneas in the Jewel Basin to watch the earth come alive…

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The first hints of daylight…P1230285 P12302931 P12303001 P12303131 P12303221 P12303341 P12303351 P12303391 P12303471 P12303491

I love these two pictures of this young man!

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The hike back down in the daylight…P12303511 P12303461 P1230352

What a wonderful experience for these guys!

A little more info about Mt. Aeneas in the Jewel Basin…

At just over 7,500 feet Mount Aeneas could easily be bypassed for other peaks with higher elevations or in more popular locations such as Glacier National Park.

To do so would be to miss a jewel of a peak. In fact, Mount Aeneas is located in the Jewel Basin. The views into Glacier National Park, The Bob Marshal Complex and The Flathead Valley are worth the easy hike to the summit. The map rates it as strenuous but by Glacier National Park Standards this is an easy class 1/2 hike.

The Jewel Basin is home to 27 lakes and most of them have fish in them. In days gone by it was possible to enter the Jewel Basin and have the area to yourself. Talk about fishing and a great wilderness experience!

Remote campsites are provided at a few selected lakes and most of them are an easy day hike away from the trailhead at Camp Misery (more on the name later). The Jewel Basin is made up of 15,349 acres (62.1 km²) and 50 miles of trails. The Jewel Basin is specially designated for hiking only, with motorized vehicles and horses prohibited.

The locals say that Camp Misery was named for the place that a local tribe spent a terrible winter. It is not impossible to imagine such a winter as the snowfall in this particular area is measured in feet not inches.

More Info Here…

Mount Aeneas is named for Chief Aeneas Paul who was born in 1828 and was also known as Big Knife II and Koostatah I.

As Chief of a band of Kootenai along the western shore of Flathead Lake, Chief Aeneas struggled with the rapid white settlement of the Flathead Valley. 

By one account, the half Iroquois Aeneas Paul rose to chief when Chief Baptiste was killed by Blackfeet Indians near the site of present-day Hungry Horse Dam in 1876. He had six children by his wife Woman’s Cry of Triumph. Two of his sons would die at the hands of white men and two would carry on as chief after him. 

Chief Aeneas is of the Dayton Creek band of the Kootenai. He is believed to be one of the negotiators of the Hell Gate Treaty of 1855 and an interpreter for missionaries such as Father Pierre Jean DeSmet. 

Other names of nearby geographic features — like Broken Leg Mountain, Lamoose Lake, and Baptiste Peak — reflect the names of Kootenai leaders from the mid-to-late 1800s. 

Source: Swan Journal article by Keith Hammer