Rain!

Saturday night we received a bit of rain and awoke to smoke-free skies.  Sunday afternoon we took a drive to through Glacier Park.

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Watching the storm clouds roll-in on Avalanche Creek…

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Clouds rolling across the valley on Going-to-the-Sun Road…

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Soot from the Reynolds Creek Fire, running off in the rain onto some red rocks..

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A quick rainbow over St. Mary’s Lake…IMG_5000

A black bear crossing the road in Many Glacier in the rain…

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We ended up enjoying our day in the rain. Normally, we would have been a bit bummed to spend the day in the rain but with the wildland fires and evacuations going on, smokey suffocating skies and how badly we need the rain this year, it really was a great day.  Kind of funny how a different perspective on things can change an attitude.  Skies have been without smoke all week, even though we still have the majority of the fires burning and we are suppose to be getting more rain, maybe even some snow in higher elevations throughout the weekend.  🙂

Over Dunraven Pass…

Black bear on Dunraven Pass while traveling through Yellowstone….

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We had such a wonderful time watching this guy, his only concern was eating.  The kids sat on top of the van, enjoying from a distance!

Linking up with friends at:

Nature Notes and

Black Bears

 

 

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Two different sows with cubs taken about a year apart.  Neither one hung out for long and by the time we stopped to pull over, the cubs that belonged to the sow below high-tailed it out there.IMG_7498

Black bears are North America’s most familiar and common bears. They typically live in forests and are excellent tree climbers, but are also found in mountains and swamps. Despite their name, black bears can be blue-gray or blue-black, brown, cinnamon, or even (very rarely) white.

Black bears are very opportunistic eaters. Most of their diet consists of grasses, roots, berries, and insects. They will also eat fish and mammals—including carrion—and easily develop a taste for human foods and garbage. Bears who become habituated to human food at campsites, cabins, or rural homes can become dangerous and are often killed—thus the frequent reminder: Please don’t feed the bears!

Solitary animals, black bears roam large territories, though they do not protect them from other bears. Males might wander a 15- to 80-square-mile (39- to 207-square-kilometer) home range.

When winter arrives, black bears spend the season dormant in their dens, feeding on body fat they have built up by eating ravenously all summer and fall. They make their dens in caves, burrows, brush piles, or other sheltered spots—sometimes even in tree holes high above the ground. Black bears den for various lengths of time governed by the diverse climates in which they live, from Canada to northern Mexico.

Female black bears give birth to two or three blind, helpless cubs in mid-winter and nurse them in the den until spring, when all emerge in search of food. The cubs will stay with their very protective mother for about two years.

For more info click here…

 

Linking up with friends at:

Nature Notes

Bear Encounters…

I found these pictures while searching for the turtle pictures the other day.  They were taken around Fortine, MT…

Momma Black Bear...

Momma Black Bear...

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Momma and Junior...

Momma and Junior...

We were on a running  four wheeler when I took these pictures, ready to get away…just in case!

Three!

Three!

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Momma not too sure...

Momma not too sure...

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Baby peeking out...

Baby peeking out...

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Still not too sure...

Still not too sure...

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Hmmm...

Hmmm...

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Moving on...

Moving on...

 

They decided to move on when a momma cow with her baby calf chased the bear away…apparently the cow didn’t know it was suppose to be afraid of the big momma bear!