Cranes…

 

Sandhill Cranes in Tetons National Park…

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Cool Facts

  • The Sandhill Crane’s call is a loud, rolling, trumpeting sound whose unique tone is a product of anatomy: Sandhill Cranes have long tracheas (windpipes) that coil into the sternum and help the sound develop a lower pitch and harmonics that add richness.

  • Sandhill Cranes are known for their dancing skills. Courting cranes stretch their wings, pump their heads, bow, and leap into the air in a graceful and energetic dance.

  • The elegance of cranes has inspired people in cultures all over the world—including the great scientist, conservationist, and nature writer Aldo Leopold, who wrote of their “nobility, won in the march of aeons.”

  • Although some start breeding at two years of age, Sandhill Cranes may reach the age of seven before breeding. They mate for life—which can mean two decades or more—and stay with their mates year-round. Juveniles stick close by their parents for 9 or 10 months after hatching.

  • The earliest Sandhill Crane fossil, estimated to be 2.5 million years old, was unearthed in the Macasphalt Shell Pit in Florida.

  • Sandhill Crane chicks can leave the nest within 8 hours of hatching, and are even capable of swimming.

  • The oldest Sandhill Crane on record was at least 36 years, 7 months old. Originally banded in Wyoming in 1973, it was found in New Mexico in 2010.

For more information, please visit here…

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Linking up with friends at:

Wild Bird WednesdayThe BIRD D’pot

NatureFootstep

Bringing in the Hay…

So thankful for strong, young backs, especially in this heat to haul hay…in a pickup without an air conditioner.  Bleck!!

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We were blessed with a brilliant sunset too…

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Mens Work?

The guys have been hard at work hauling hay all weekend.  Last night was the last load until  next cutting.  Since they arrived home so late and still hadn’t eaten supper they decided that Sawyer would just unload the hay this morning.  Coming back from my walk I seen this…

The hay…

As I got closer…

 

Little boys helping do the heavy work…

 

Watch out below…

 

Little boys *BIG* muscles!

 

Bucking bales...

 

 

Team work!

Storing Up…

It’s hard to believe that summer is leaving us fast behind.  With fall just around the corner the guys here have been busy hauling hay for all the various creatures here to sustain them through the winter.

Finally home well after the sun had gone down...

Finally home well after the sun had gone down...

 

Mark

 

Reaching

 

 

Sawyer bucking bales...

Sawyer bucking bales...

 

The barn with hay again...

The barn with hay again...

 

 

Stack of hay...

Stack of hay...

 

What every farm needs or maybe what every 16 year old boy needs to do?

Hard Work...

This is what every farm needs or maybe it’s what every 16 year old boy needs to do? ;0)
What would haying be without a little hay ride?

What would haying be without a little hay ride?

Their only about half way done and we need about another 6 tons, but their getting closer.  The hay is absolutely beautiful, a nice alfalfa grass mix that’s very leafy and I’m sure the sheep will do very well on it this winter.  Tori also was able to help by driving the pickup while the guys threw hay into the back, she did a good job.  She was even able to throw her dad off the trailer while going down one of the hills on the bumpy field when she got going a bit too fast and helped redistribute the hay a bit on the trailer…  But hey that’s what learning all about right?  ;0)
Thanks to CJ for all your help the other night-you definitely saved Mark’s shoulder by volunteering to help us and to the Krantz’s for their wonderful help too.  Thanks to the Vo-Ag Center for the beautiful hay.