Grand Tetons

Taking in the beauty of this wonderful place…

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On our last day of camping in the Tetons, we hooked up to our camper, headed down the road and had to make a decision as to which road to take to go back to Yellowstone.  We decided at the last minute to veer closer to the mountains in hope of seeing more elk. While driving we saw a cow and calf elk come running full tilt out of the trees, we quickly pulled off the road and decided to wait and see what else would come out…

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 Here comes the rest of the herd…

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With a nice bull…

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We were definitely happy campers seeing these beautiful animals our last day in Tetons!

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Mountain Bluebirds…

 

We spotted these beautiful Mountain Bluebirds this fall, while we were in the Tetons, around Mormon Row…

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Cool Facts

  • Most studies of the Mountain Bluebird involve birds in nest boxes. Little is known about natural nest site requirements.
  • Only the female builds the nest. The male sometimes acts as if he is helping, but he either brings no nest material or he drops it on the way.
  • Mountain and Western bluebirds compete for nest boxes, and may exclude each other from their territories. In the small area where they overlap, the Mountain Bluebird dominates the Eastern Bluebird. This relationship may limit the westward expansion of the Eastern Bluebird.
  • The Mountain Bluebird often occurs outside its normal range in winter. Individuals are casually recorded in western and northern Alaska, and in the midwestern and eastern states.

For more information, please visit here…

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Aspens…

My favorite tree, again!  :0)  They are finally starting to turn beautiful colors at the farm….

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I have to sneak in here the last of the flowers…

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They were starting in Tetons and Yellowstone a couple of weeks ago…

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Back at home…

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A couple of the adventures we had while on vacation…

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Teigen crawling on a log suspended over a creek…

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Garrett and Hayden seeing if they can jump the creek…P1050722 P1050723 P1050724 P1050725 P1050726

The crew turning cart-wheels…

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Still enjoying the greenness of the year, though fall and other colors are starting to show.

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Who-Who-Whoooo’s There?

 

Just this beautiful Great Grey Owl…

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Great Gray Owls have a talent for detecting and seizing prey under thick layers of snow and ice. One Great Gray Owl reportedly plunged through a crust of snow thick enough to support a 175-pound person!

Great Gray Owls inhabit boreal forests in Canada, northern Europe, and Siberia. Their North American range also includes limited areas of forest in the Cascades, Sierra Nevada, Rocky Mountains, and smaller ranges in the mountain states. Great Gray Owls prefer forest habitat adjacent to open meadows, bogs, or muskeg.

Great Gray Owls feed almost exclusively on small mammals, especially voles and pocket gophers. They usually hunt by perching on branches or treetops, watching and listening for prey below. They also hunt by ear alone, hovering above snow and plunging down to take prey under the surface. They fly with slow, deep, wingbeats. Great Gray Owls often hunt actively during daylight.

Great Gray Owls have large heads in the shape of a half dome, and relatively long, wedge-shaped tails. They have a large round facial disc, with several narrow concentric rings of white and gray around each eye. Their body plumage is mostly gray, with fine irregular stippling of gray, white, and some brown. Their eyes are yellow, and appear small within the owl’s wide facial disc and massive head. Great Gray Owls have distinct white “bowties” under their chins; the bird’s Russian common name, “Bearded Owl,” refers to this marking.

Measuring up to about 32 inches from head to tail, Great Gray Owls are the largest owls in North America. Males and females have similar plumage but females are larger than males. Their massive appearance, however, is deceiving. Most of the Great Gray Owl’s apparent bulk comes from its fluffy plumage and large head. Its body weight, at about 2.5 pounds, is less than that of the Great Horned Owl and the Snowy Owl.

For more info please visit here…

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