A quick, cold dip…

This evening we decided we would go for a quick dip, when at 7 pm it was still 90 degrees outside.

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The kids were able to cool off…

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Zayne and his heart-shaped rock…

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 A bit of splashing going on!

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Teigen’s dinosaur claw rock…

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The girls flipping their hair…

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Zayne warming up!

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Emma, very cold…

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Maddie’s heart-shaped rock…

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A quick group picture below the mountains…

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Trying to warm up…

IMG_7474 The consensus was that Lake McDonald was very cold!  All that freshly melted mountain snow made hands and feet tingle and turn white.  Brrrr…  The little kids didn’t play too long in the water but had fun finding and skipping rocks.  The big kids surprised me at how long they swam, double brrrr….

A couple of evening pictures, not much color but a beautiful place to cool off and get away from the mosquitoes.

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Moving…

 

On Sunday, it was time to move sheep to new pasture.  Their current pasture had been grazed down pretty well.

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When Mark had went to open up the gate to the new pasture he found this little guy…

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It appeared to have an injured wing and we didn’t want it to get crushed by the hooves of the sheep.  It was moved several feet away, to the adjoining pasture that didn’t have grazers in it.  The kids thought it was pretty cool!

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Let the moving commence, out of the old pasture, across the road…

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Through the gate and into the new pasture…

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Lots of tall, green grass here…

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Scattering a bit, in search of goodies!

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Happy Day!

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Xerophyllum tenax

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Bear Grass looks like a grass, but really belongs to the lily family. It is about 4.5 feet tall. Its olive-colored, grass-like leaves grow from the base of the plant and are tough and wiry. The outside leaves clasp around the stem. The leaves have toothed margins, and grow about 35 inches long, getting shorter as they near the flowers, looking very much like a fan.

The flowers of bear grass grow on a stalk that can be 6 feet tall with many small flowers. Each flower is creamy white, and saucer shaped, and has a sweet

aroma. The lowest flowers bloom first, creating a tight knot of buds at the top. The entire flower looks a little like fluffy, upside down ice cream cone. Bear grass tends to flower in 5 to 7 year cycles. After the fruit sets, the plant dies. It reproduces by seed, and by sending out offshoots from its rhizomes.

 

Bear grass is found in open forests and meadows at sub alpine and low alpine elevations in the western United States. It is commonly found under alpine larch (Larix lyallii) and whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands on cold, rocky sites at upper timberlines.

Bear grass is a fire-resistant species that is the first plant to grow after a fire. Bear grass, and many other native plants, need periodic burns to produce strong, new growth. After a fire bear grass sprouts from its rhizomes which lie just under the surface. Light fires of short duration are best. Intense fires which linger in the same place for a long time will kill the rhizomes under the ground, and prevent the bear grass from growing back.

Find more info here

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