New Life…

 

We spotted this little Mountain Goat on a little walk at Logan Pass, GNP….

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Another doe and her yearling…

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BASIC FACTS ABOUT MOUNTAIN GOATS

Despite its name, the mountain goat is actually a member of the antelope family. It has a long face, long black horns and a short tail. Both males and females have beard-like hair on their chins. The mountain goat sports a coat of wooly, white fur that keeps it warm at high elevations. This coat has a double layer for added warmth during winter—the overcoat molts, or falls off, during summer time.

Known for their agility, mountain goats are most often seen scaling steep, rocky ledges. This extreme alpine environment provides them with adequate protection from predators. Strong muscular forequarters and pliable hooves with soft rubbery pads help them maintain traction on craggy rock surfaces and survive in harsh conditions.

Diet

Mountain goats eat grasses, sedges, herbs, shrubs, ferns mosses and lichen.

Population

Did You Know?

From around the age of 22 months, it is possible to tell the age of a mountain goat by counting the number of rings on its horns!

There are an estimated 100,000 Mountain Goats in North America.

Range

The Rocky Mountain and coastal ranges of northwestern North America, including southwestern Alaska.

Behavior

Mountain goats are active both during the day and night, but take time to rest under overhanging cliffs. They mostly live in herds and move around according to season. In the summer, smaller groups will travel to salt licks. Females, called nannies, spend most of the year in herds with their kids, while males either live alone or with 2 – 3 other males. Nannies can be protective of their territory and food, and so will fight other nannies in their herds. During mating season, males will fight each other using their horns for the right to mate with females.

Reproduction

Mating Season: November and December.
Gestation: 150-180 days.
Litter size: Typically one kid; twins rarely.
At birth, the kid weighs around 6 lbs and are able to move along the rocks with its mother within a day or so after

 

To learn more on Mountain Goats please visit here….

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Linking up with friends at:

Nature Notes

LITTLE THINGS THURSDAY

Thursday Favorite Things Blog Hop

8 comments on “New Life…

  1. How sweet that little baby is. I didn’t know anything about them… Great post for Nature Notes.. Thank you…Michelle

  2. Margaret says:

    Wonderful find and shots with great information. Thanks

  3. Sharon says:

    The little one is just adorable. You did a great job taking photos of white animals on white. Finding you from Little Things Thursday. And amazed that you are raising 8 children! Good for you! 🙂

  4. Sweet little baby. I love the gentle little face.

  5. dianaed2013 says:

    Very interesting and the photos are lovely

  6. what a lovely discovery. Great photos! Thank you for joining the fun at the Thursday Favorite Things Blog Hop. xo

  7. Your photos are gorgeous and your knowledge astounding. Thanks so much!

  8. Love your mountain goat photos. Just found your blog and love it!

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