Around a Pond

While driving to Many Glaciers, my poor, tired husband needed a bit of a nap.  He pulled over here and took quick nap while I  got out to explore a bit…

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The Aspens trees were just leafing out…

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Some Mallards…IMG_3928-Edit

Bufflehead ducks..IMG_4555-Edit IMG_3980-Edit

Glacier Lilies…

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Linking up with:

Wild Bird Wednesday and The BIRD D’pot

Grouse…

 

We spotted this little lady on the side of the road by Swiftcurrent in Many Glaciers…

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Cool Facts

  • Two distinct subspecies of Spruce Grouse exist. “Franklin’s Grouse,” D. c. franklinii, found in the southwestern portion of the range, in the mountains from Alberta southward, has an all black tail with small white spots on the feathers overlying it. The northeastern subspecies, D. c. canadensis, has a rufous tip to the tail and lacks white spots above the tail.

  • The Spruce Grouse’s crop can store up to ten percent of the bird’s body weight in food, to be digested at night.

  • The Spruce Grouse’s gastrointestinal organs change with seasonal shifts in diet. In winter, when the bird must eat more food to maintain its mass and energy balance, the gizzard grows by about 75 percent, and other sections of the digestive tract increase in length by about 40 percent.

  • For more info please visit here…

Linking up with:

Wild Bird Wednesday and The BIRD D’pot

Pulsatilla Family…

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Fuzzy petals…

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Fuzzy leaves…

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Common names include pasque flower (or pasqueflower), wind flowerprairie crocusEaster Flower, and meadow anemone. Several species are valued ornamentals because of their finely-dissected leaves, solitary bell-shaped flowers, and plumed seed heads. The showy part of the flower consists of sepals, not petals.

The flower blooms early in spring, which leads to the common name Pasque flower, since Pasque refers to Easter (Passover).

Pulsatilla is highly toxic, and produces cardiogenic toxins and oxytoxins which slow the heart in humans. Excess use can lead to diarrhoea, vomiting and convulsions, hypotension and coma. It has been used as a medicine by Native Americans for centuries. Blackfoot Indians used it to induce abortions and childbirth. Pulsatilla should not be taken during pregnancy nor during lactation.

Extracts of Pulsatilla have been used to treat reproductive problems such as premenstrual syndrome and epididymitis. Additional applications of plant extracts include uses as a sedative and for treating coughs. It is also used as an initial ingredient in homeopathic remedies.

For more info please read here…

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Evening view into Glacier National Park

Linking up with:

Macro Monday

Shine the Divine